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Home / Crow's Nest / Let’s Visit Some Creepy Abandoned (but hauntingly beautiful) Places (Part 5)

Let’s Visit Some Creepy Abandoned (but hauntingly beautiful) Places (Part 5)

Let’s chill. Is this spine-tingling enough for you? This is the washing room of the abandoned Zeche Hugo coal mine. See those ominous chain and hooks? Do you wonder if their purpose is to inflict torture? Very creepy. Pic by Marcel Fischer.
Let’s chill. Is this spine-tingling enough for you? This is the washing room of the abandoned Zeche Hugo coal mine. See those ominous chain and hooks? Do you wonder if their purpose is to inflict torture? Very creepy. Pic by Marcel Fischer.

 

CREEPY ABANDONED PLACES is back, just to send chills up your spine. Right now, chills are good.  We’re in dire need of some in this enervating, scorching, relentless, suffocating heatwave. Would you believe the temperature in Kuala Lumpur (today 11 June 2017) is 85°F| 29.5°C and humidity levels are at a sweaty 85%? The air is so still you could stand a leaf up on its end and it’ll remain turgid for as long as you want no kidding! (OK, so I am kidding). Anyway, apparently tomorrow (Monday 12 June 2017), it’ll be worse. The weather forecast says we’ll hit 89°F| 31°C and a nice, rounded, thermometer-busting 90°F| 32.2°C on Friday 16 June. We hope the weatherman is lying but just in case he isn’t, I say we get some chillin’ done right now.

1 Miner’s Bath House in an Abandoned Coal Mine

Coal mining isn’t for the fainthearted. And neither is looking at their laundry hanging from the ceiling like that. Pic from: Static Flicker
Coal mining isn’t for the fainthearted. And neither is looking at their laundry hanging from the ceiling like that. Pic from: Static Flicker

 

Ah. The power of suggestion. Actually, it’s not as bloodcurdling as it looks.  There’s a mundane explanation to all of this. The chains and hanging clothing are an “old-fashioned” but ingenious men’s locker room cum clothes dryer for miners back in the 1950s and 60s. We dont know if they still do it now.

“The chains took up dirty mining clothes and aired them,” wrote a JD Haley to the Observer Reporter. “Baskets are hanging for their clean clothes, and there may be individual padlocks at the bottom of each chain to secure them.”

In other words, this methodology was the logical security solution for the hundreds of men working separate shifts at the mines.  Those going down the shafts would change into their work clothes and have their day clothes and wallets pulled up to the ceiling using those chains on a pulley system. Once high above the ground, the hanging items would be secured by a padlock at the bottom to ensure the clothes stayed up. This would keep personal belongings safe and out of the reach from pilfering hands (you can’t trust the people you work with) and when the day was done, the blackened workclothes would be changed out of, washed, and pulled up to ceiling to dry naturally in the ceiling fan (they didn’t use clothes dryers in those days).

This area for drying clothes is sometimes called a Dry or Cage room or Changing room or Locker room or Bath house.

Still, it makes a creepy picture.

2 Abandoned Mill in the Valley of Mills, Sorrento, Italy

Abandoned since 1866. Pic from imgur
Abandoned since 1866. Pic from imgur

 

Sorrento, a coastal town in southwestern Italy facing the Bay of Naples, is known for many splendours such as its sweeping water views, its old-world charm cafe-lined square called Tasso Square and its warren of narrow alleys that is also home to a 14th century church by the name of the Chiesa di San Francesco. But just outside, adjacent the town centre is a deep canyon, a chasm in the limestone plateau formed by volcanic eruptions some 37,000 years ago. That deep canyon is known as “The valley of the mills” in which lies the ruins of many old industries such as this an old mill that used to produce flour. The mill was abandoned around 1866 when the creation of Tasso Square isolated the factory from the Gulf of Naples, provoking a tremendous rise in the humidity, which in turn caused an immense amount of vegetation growth such as a rare fern which soon consumed the area. Today, the abandoned mill sits quietly in the gorge, lonely and forsaken but yet a hauntingly beautiful sight. It’s open to tourists though. (Info from Wikipedia Sorrento).

 

Another angle of the sad, forgotten mill. Pic by Juan Salmora/flickr
Another angle of the sad, forgotten mill. Pic by Juan Salmora/flickr

 

Speaking of Sorrento, want to know more about the amour of the place? Here’s a classic from the legendary silken-voiced crooner Dean Martin (also remembered as the ‘King of Cool’ for good reason), that encapsulates the romantic heart of the resort town of Sorrento. Listen up.

Dean Martin – Come Back To Sorrento 

3 Staircase of an Old Factory in Italy

 

Lyrical terror. Pic from Akon Konnected
Lyrical terror. Pic from Akon Konnected

 

Among the many abandoned factories in Italy, is this abandoned factory.  The location is unknown but the staircase is artistically eerie enough to make your heart want to stay, stare and admire while your head screams RUN!

Like the story so far? Go read the first few in the series on Creepy Abandoned Places Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part4. Have fun.

4 Environmental Hazard─ I.M. Cooling Tower, Belgium

 

Looks like a vortex to the centre of the earth. Pic by flickrPippakillinova
Looks like a vortex to the centre of the earth. Pic by flickrPippakillinova

 

Originally built in 1921, the I.M. Cooling Tower in Charleroi, Belgium was one of the largest coal-burning power plants in Europe. Water would flow into the tower which was then cooled by the wind that swept in from portals at the tower’s base and the hot air was released. Fifty years later, the plant and its massive tower was the main source of power in the Charleroi area and was able to cool down 480,000 gallons of water per minute. Unfortunately, the billowing clouds of hot air that came from the towers for so many decades caused 10% of Belgium’s carbon dioxide emissions and after environmental protests, the plant was shut down in 2007. (Words excerpted from Akon Konnected).

 

Huge and desolate. Pic by flickrPippakillinova
Huge and desolate. Pic by flickrPippakillinova

 

5 The Overgrown Grounds of a Palace in Poland

 

Dare you enter? Pic by Lucas Malkiewicz
Dare you enter? Pic by Lucas Malkiewicz

 

Built in 1910 for the Polish Royalty, this castle was a splendorous beauty in its hey day with imbibing stories of kings and queens in all their royal heritage. But that century turned out to be a time of uncertainty for the country. The communist rule transformed the palace into an agricultural school, as well as a home for mentally handicapped adults and children. The palace that once sung of the Polish royalty was abandoned  following the fall of the USSR. All that remains now is dereliction. (Text mostly from: inyminy)

6 A Page Off History ─ The New Bedford Orphuem, USA

Empty halls where voices once rang and where life was, but a stage. Pic by Frank Grace
Empty halls where voices once rang and where life was, but a stage. Pic by Frank Grace

 

The Orpheum Theater is an old theatre and movie house located at 1005 Water Street in New Bedford, Massachusetts USA, originally named the Majestic Opera House. The building opened on April 15, 1912 (the same day the Titanic sank). Under the ownership of The French Sharpshooter’s Club of New Bedford, the building had been open for nearly fifty years and it contained an armoured shooting range and ballroom. and it had helped train troops for World War I and World War II. The club leased the theatre to the Orpheum Circuit of Boston. It not only had vaudeville shows, but once that was in decline, the Orpheums switched to movies. This Orpheum theatre is believed to be the second oldest (it was built a year after the Orpheum Theatre in Los Angeles).

When the theatre opened it seated 1,500 people. The theatre closed in 1958-59, and was only opened for special events. The sharpshooters club sold it in 1962, and it was used as storage by a tobacco company. The back of the theatre currently houses a supermarket, but the rest of the space is still empty. The building is currently privately owned. (Text excerpted from Wikipedia Orpheum).

 

Details of the artwork. Pic by Marc N. Belanger Wikipedia CCO
Details of the artwork. Pic by Marc N. Belanger Wikipedia CCO

 

7 Abandoned Subway Tunnel in Kiev, Ukraine

See those Stalagtites in the red glow? Nobody ever goes here. Pic by General Kosmosa.livejournal
See those Stalagtites dripping down the ceiling in the red glow? Nobody ever goes here. Pic by General Kosmosa.livejournal

 

This image of an abandoned subway tunnel is from within the metro system underneath the city of Kiev, Ukraine. Many of the tunnels remain flooded with underground water and are home to scary hanging stalactites that dangle from the ceilings. The tunnel ceilings are 12m in diameter, embedded like a catacomb deep underground.  (Text and Info from inyminy and General Kosmosa).

 

Eerie tunnel vision. Pic from General Kosmosa.livejournal
Eerie tunnel vision. Pic from General Kosmosa.livejournal

 

8 The Eastern State Penitentiary – Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

The corridors of gruesome memories of the peeling Eastern State Penintiary. Pic by the Explorographer
The corridors of gruesome memories in the peeling Eastern State Penintiary. Pic by the Explorographer

 

The Eastern State Penitentiary, also known as ESP, is a former American prison in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It is located at 2027 Fairmount Avenue between Corinthian Avenue and North 22nd Street in the Fairmount section of the city, and was operational from 1829 until 1971. The penitentiary refined the revolutionary system of separate incarceration first pioneered at the Walnut Street Jail which emphasized principles of reform rather than punishment.

 

Al Capone was holed up in here! Here’s a look at the exterior. Pic by the Explorographer
Al Capone was holed up in here! Here’s a look at the exterior. Pic by the Explorographer

 

Al Capone aka Scarface in the 1930s.
Al Capone aka Scarface in the 1930s.

 

Notorious criminals such as Al Capone (also known as Scarface) and bank robber Willie Sutton were held inside its innovative wagon wheel design. James Bruno (Big Joe) and several male relatives were incarcerated here between 1936-1948 for the alleged murders in the Kelayres Massacre of 1934, before they were pardoned.

At its completion, the building was the largest and most expensive public structure ever erected, and quickly became a model for more than 300 prisons worldwide.

Now closed as a prison, the building is currently a US National Historic Landmark, which is open to the public as a museum for tours seven days a week, 12 months a year, 10 am to 5 pm. Go visit. (Text excerpted from Wikipedia Eastern State Penitentiary).

 

The penitentiary operated from 1829 all through 1971. Who knows what deep dark stories the walls hide eh? Pic by the Explorographer
The penitentiary operated from 1829 all through 1971. Who knows what deep dark secrets the walls hide eh? Pic by the Explorographer

 

And there you have it folks. Hope you got nicely chilled. More on Abandoned Buildings coming up but this time, we’re going to check out Abandoned Places used as Hollywood Film Locations. Remember Shutter Island? Uh huh.

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