Monday , December 18 2017
Home / Entertainment / Bread Art, Hair Art, Straw Art…Unexpected Art from Unusual Materials (Part 3)

Bread Art, Hair Art, Straw Art…Unexpected Art from Unusual Materials (Part 3)

This is the third and final segment of our art appreciation series. Expect the unexpected from unusual materials like, say…bread. It’s not just good for eating, it’s the inspiration for a whole lot of creative projects like baking lifelike portraits of the Mona Lisa ─ no kidding, thanks to the invention of that humble little thing we make our wholesome breakfasts with  every morning: the toaster! The toaster turns bread into toast of various shades and that’s all it takes for an artist to get inspired.

But that’s not all we’re checking out today. We’ll also be looking at hair art ─ not just on the head as in hairstyles but um…sewn into embroidery, drinking straw art, more meat art ─ the gross kind this time (ugh…but hey, this is art), more colour pencil art ─ and we’re not talking about drawing with those colour pencils either, and finally, beautiful bug art ─ made from flowers.

So check out our third and final part of Unexpected Art from Unusual Materials ─ another collection of the next 9 of the most unusual pieces of art made from…well, the last things you’d imagine.

The first two parts are here in case you missed them: Toiletpaper Art? Meat Art?  Unexpected Art from Unusual Materials (Part 1), and Bubble Gum, Masking Tape, Bottle Caps & Cutlery…Unexpected Art from Unusual Materials (Part 2).

 

Those little squares aren’t tiles. They are bread! All 2,500 slices. “The Toaster” by Ingrid Falk and Gus¬tav Aguerre, is today a permanent feature of the Modern Art Museum of Buenos Aires
Those little squares aren’t tiles. They are bread! All 2,500 slices. “The Toaster” by Ingrid Falk and Gus¬tav Aguerre, is today a permanent feature of the Modern Art Museum of Buenos Aires

 

1 Bread or Toast Art. Called the greatest thing since sliced bread, Toast Art or toast mosaic is one of the zaniest forms of food art that uses a whole lotta bread and well…a toaster to create.

One of the first proponents to see art in bread and the miracle of the everyday toaster was Ingrid Falk of Sweden, and her husband, Gus­tav Aguerre of Argentina. Together, they created “The Toaster”  ─  a 16ft by 15 ft installation requiring 2,500 slices of bread in the year 2000. “The Toaster” today hangs in the Modern Art Museum of Buenos Aires, Argentina. (Pic from fa-art).

But Falk and Aguerre are not the only people to see art in toast, there is also New Zealand artist Maurice Bennett, aka The Toastman who loves his toast, not only in his mouth but mounted on the wall as well. He made several portraits out of toast of the Mona Lisa, Marilyn Monroe, Peter Jackson and even Barack Obama.  (Pic from mr breakfast).

Left: Let's toast Obama! This piece of art was lovingly baked in 2010 by Maurice Bennet. Right: Mona Lisa with Wine Glass mounted in K11 Mall, Hong Kong.
Left: Let’s toast Obama! This piece of art was lovingly baked in 2010 by Maurice Bennet. Right: Mona Lisa with Wine Glass mounted in K11 Mall, Hong Kong.

 

 

Colour pencil Gorilla. Look at the details such as the vines and foliage. Everything is anatomically correct.
Colour pencil Gorilla. Look at the details such as the vines and foliage. Everything is anatomically correct.

 

2 More Colour Pencil Art, not used to draw but to form. How clever! This gorilla is actually part of a print advertising campaign by RLR, an ad agency, for the Los Angeles Zoo. Great concept! The photographer is: R.Salamaca.

 

Here is a closeup. Look at the eyes.
Here is a closeup. Look at the eyes.

 

 

Straw Art: Lips by Sang Sik Hong. Looks at the thousands of straws used! This is a huge wall installation.
Straw Art: Lips by Sang Sik Hong. Looks at the thousands of straws used! This is a huge wall installation.

 

3 Straw Art 1.  These huge lips were made by Sang Sik Hong, Korean artist and graduate of Mokwon University. The lips are made out of thousands of flimsy plastic drinking straws. (Pic from inhabitat).

 

 

Straw Art: Face. And a creepy one at that! Actually this is the Nestea Drinking Straw Sculpture campaign constructed by Publicis.
Straw Art: Face. And a creepy one at that! Actually this is the Nestea Drinking Straw Sculpture campaign constructed by Publicis.

 

4 Straw Art 2. This surreal, ethereal face was created by Publicis, an advertising agency in Argentina for Nestea. The campaign’s slogan was “Eres lo que tomas,” or “You are what you drink.”

 

 

Straw Art: Swelling. By Annie Boyden Varnot. Very pretty and enigmatic with light play from the inside.
Straw Art: Swelling. By Annie Boyden Varnot. Very pretty and enigmatic with light play from the inside.

 

5 Straw Art 3.  Annie Boyden Varnot’s take on straws is a little different in that she invents biomorphic forms and landscapes. Very colourful and enigmatic with lights and all. (Pics and info from webecoist).

 

 

This one is made out of thin air! That’s the material used as it is simpy clever photography. It is included in this list because the art is eye catching and humourous.
This one is made out of thin air! That’s the material used as it is simpy clever photography. It is included in this list because the art is eye catching and humourous.

 

6 Photography: Zipper on a lawn. Atlanta-based photographer and art director Stephen McMennamy uses the most available but unseen material of all for his works: creativity, imagination, and well…a good camera. Through these faculties, he continues his humorous split-image photo juxtapositions called combophotos.

 

 

This is totally so Hannibal Lecter’s cup of tea, wouldn’t you say? ‘Hommage a Meret Oppenheim’ by Betty Hirst, is a tea cup made of bacon. Look carefully and you’ll see the fat dripping on the table but the grossness is the whole idea behind the exhibition. (Pic: Eat Me Daily)
This is totally so Hannibal Lecter’s cup of tea, wouldn’t you say? ‘Hommage a Meret Oppenheim’ by Betty Hirst, is a tea cup made of bacon. Look carefully and you’ll see the fat dripping on the table but the grossness of it all is the whole idea behind the exhibition. (Pic: Eat Me Daily)

 

7 More Meat Art. The exhibits (of meat sculptures) was an exhibition that was held back in 2008 at the Daneyal Mahmood Gallery in New York City. It showcased contemporary artists who use meat in their work, whether it’s sculpture, photography, painting, and video pieces. The raison d’etre for the exhibition was “in order to investigate the paradoxical relationship meat has to the body,” said the press release. But it triggered the ire of PETA who demanded the exhibition to be taken down.

The gallery, however, shot back and explained its stand, quoting from its own press release that the show was not to celebrate meat consumption but to demonstrate its visceral ugliness. The statement said:

“Unless you’re Hannibal Lecter, there’s nothing ‘artistic’ or ‘joyful’ about meat… If it’s unacceptable to kill humans for an art exhibit, then it should be unacceptable to kill animals too.” (Pics via eatmedaily).

 

Adam Brandejs' powerful and disturbing, ‘Animatronic Flesh Shoe’. This Ed Gein-inspired shoe (remember ‘Silence of the Lambs’ and the skin-loving serial killer it portrayed?) is supposed to twitch when switched on. Look closely. The meat is turning purple with putrefaction. (Pic: Eat Me Daily)
Adam Brandejs’ powerful and disturbing, ‘Animatronic Flesh Shoe’. This Ed Gein-inspired shoe (remember ‘Silence of the Lambs’ and the skin-loving serial killer it portrayed?) is supposed to twitch when switched on. Look closely. The meat is turning purple with putrefaction. (Pic: Eat Me Daily)

 

‘Water Closet’, by Simone Rachell. (Pic: Eat Me Daily)
‘Water Closet’, by Simone Rachell. (Pic: Eat Me Daily)

 

 

Hairy stuff this and creepy too. Bill Finks’ portrait of a little girl made entirely out of his own hair.
Hairy stuff this and creepy too. Bill Finks’ portrait of a little girl made entirely out of his own hair.

 

8 Hair Art. It’s pretty amazing what you can do with hair. No, we are not talking about braiding or bunning but turning hair into works of art like portraits or embroidery. Like Zaira Pulido. She is a Colombian artist who uses long strands of human hair to create embroidery, much like how someone would use the needle and thread.

 

Bogota-based Zaira Pulido’s human hair embroidery.
Bogota-based Zaira Pulido’s human hair embroidery.

 

And then there is Bill Fink. He makes portraits out of anything, like um…human ashes, soil and hair. Like the above portrait. Eerie stuff.

And you might have seen this one going viral recently. Serbian barber Mario Hvala, made international headlines for trimming a detailed portrait of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on the back of a customer’s head. The likeness bowled everybody over.  He is quite famous now. The next time you’re needing a hair art cut in Serbia, check Hvala out. He is creating designs and celebrity portraits on people’s heads like no other in the House Damian hair salon, Novi Sad, Serbia. (Pics from odditycentral).

Oooh…Spitting image. This is barber Mario Hvala’s work.
Oooh…Spitting image. This is barber Mario Hvala’s work.

 

 

A Stag Beetle, seen very differently.
A Stag Beetle, seen very differently.

 

9 Bug Art. Insects have never been seen like this before. Instead of revulsion, you admire its intricate beauty.  Montreal-based multi-disciplinary artist Raku Inoue has cleverly altered the perception of insects from abhorrent creepy crawlies to much-desired aesthetic works of art through his flower arrangement series called ‘Natura Insects’.

As a flower arrangement given a delightful twist, ‘Natura Insects’ features 9 types of bugs, including beetles, butterflies and spiders. Gossamer wings now take on a new meaning represented by velvety petals.

To create each winged creature, Inoue arranges the floral elements onto plain white paper. The delicate parts of the insects such as the legs, antennae, and even pincers are creatively sculpted from other parts of a flower, including tiny leaves, fragile stems, and emerging buds.

‘Natura Insects’ showcases Raku Inoue ‘s creative use of materials and unexpected approach to his subject matter. Now you don’t mind a Black Widow Spider adorning your coffeetable. (Pics from mymodernmet).

 

A Japanese Rhinocerous Beetle
A Japanese Rhinocerous Beetle.

 

A Dragonfly
A Dragonfly.

 

A Black Widow Spider
A Black Widow Spider.

 

A Firefly
A Firefly.

Check Also

Peacocks Can Fly! plus 9 Other Feathery Facts You Need To Know

  Now why would anyone want to know about a peacock, you might ask. Well, …